Essays On Ghosts Are Real

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Heathcliff’s belief that she is still out walking the moors, and Lockwood’s experience with her outside his window, develop Catherine and Heathcliff’s highly spiritual relationship.

Without the existence of the ghost story in is that as a realist narrator, he has the duty to recount the entire story, without leaving any detail out.

Ignoring the ghost story in the novel would be ignoring a part of the story, and, as a former city dweller who prizes rational thought and integrity, it would be unjust for Lockwood to exclude any aspect of the story, even if it seems unscientific.

Despite the scientific nature of realist novels, realism is not limited to merely the factual truth: it must include all aspects of the truth, all points of view, and all versions.

He claims that the setting is distinctly Yorkshire and that “the language of Nelly, Joseph and Hareton is the language of Yorkshire people” (161).

As further evidence for the painstaking detail Emily Brontë put into her work, C. Sanger analysed the passage of time throughout the novel and found the ages of the characters and the years are accurate throughout the novel (134–136). Heathcliff desires to be haunted by Catherine, but she refuses to.This “twist” is the inclusion of a ghost story as part of the realism in the novel. In an age of realism, believing in ghosts was frowned upon by the educated upper classes; however, the supernatural was still widely believed in the lower class, especially by the lower class in .As a genre, the ghost story typically includes at least one ghost who is seen, felt, or perceived by a character, the perception of which generally inspires “dread or unease” in the character (ODLT). Nellie claims that “the country folks, if you ask them, would swear on the Bible that he walks: there are those who speak to having met him near the church, and on the moor, and even within this house,” proving that the supernatural does not just exist for the main characters — it is believed in by the lower class as well (430).Even though Lockwood, and to some extent Nellie, are uncomfortable talking about supernatural events, they feel it is their duty to tell the entire story regardless of its plausibility.Smajic writes that holders of the “fixed, stable narrative point of view,” are in a double bind when presenting the supernatural to their audience, since they must deal with the “instinctive faith in the evidence of one’s sight and the troubling knowledge that vision is often deceptive and unreliable” (1109).The followed exchange describes how Catherine is coming from the moor and wants to return home: “‘Let me in — let me in! The vision of a ghost causes Catherine to want to leave the Grange, which is sheltered from the moor, and head towards Wuthering Heights, which is surrounded by the moor.Thus, Catherine associates the supernatural to the moor.The moor is a haunted, creepy, unknown land: in such a setting, ghostly appearances become a natural feature of the world, not a supernatural one (Cecil 150). Later in the novel, an apparition of Hareton Earnshaw appears to Catherine, and she recalls that “my bodily eye was cheated into a momentary belief that the child lifted its face and stared straight into mine!When the ghost of Catherine first appears to Lockwood, she appears against the backdrop of the moors, just outside the window, like she had risen out of the wild land and was trying to find her way inside to safety (119). ’ I asked, struggling, meanwhile, to disengage myself. It vanished in a twinkling; but immediately I felt an irresistible yearning to be at the Heights” (203).Lockwood tells Heathcliff that he saw “that minx, Catherine Linton, or Earnshaw, or however she was called — she must have been a changeling — wicked little soul,” which causes Heathcliff to burst into rage, then cry alone: “Come in! When Nellie tells Lockwood that she met a boy on a “dark evening, threatening thunder” who was afraid of the ghost of Heathcliff, she dismisses his fears, saying that he “probably raised the phantoms from thinking, as he traversed the moors alone, on the nonsense he had heard his parents and companions repeat” (430).Yet, she tells him that she is uncomfortable in the house or the dark and is impatient to move back to the Grange (430).

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